Additional information for residents of Quebec only: The regular annual applicants of a Triangle credit card is 22.99% for cash transactions and related fees and 19.99% for all other charges. Some applicants may receive a higher or lower regular annual rate depending on a credit evaluation. The minimum payment is the sum of (a) interest and fees shown on your statement, (b) the greater of any amount past due or any balance over your credit limit, (c) the amount of any equal payments plan instalments then due, and (d) $10. Balances under $10 are due in full. For residents of Quebec, the period between the statement date and the due date for payment is 26 days. The billing period covered by each statement can be from 28-33 days. No annual fee. Examples of borrowing costs (rounded to the nearest cent) assuming that all charges are purchases bearing interest at the regular annual rate of 19.99%, a 30 day month, no charges made on special payment plans and no other fees, additional payments or other changes are:
Thanks so much for the replies. I think I am somewhat of a collector/roster builder. I go around doing the dailies but I also like buying pets just for their looks. I watched hazelnutty on youtube last night. I think I will focus on doing the expeditions when I have time to get all the pets that come from that. Then I will go back and do old raids like Eekwibble suggested.
Dec 28, 2016 Better Living through Technology!(new2macros) *note: this guide is for people who haven't used macros or advanced keybinds and want to try. Macros are basically 'super buttons' that you can create in order to use multiple abilities and spells from the same button. This means even if you have 15 different abilities, you can key them all to 3-5 buttons. With macros you can do things like: 1) have all your buff spells on one button 2) 'hide' abilities that you don't use very often so they only show when you need them 3) 'group' similar abilities so that, for example, all your commonly used melee skills are on one button 4) maximize your rotation so that you're always one step ahead of the GCD Macros are great, but there are a few limitations: 1) complicated! -learning macros takes a good chunk of time. It's only something I've been able to do since my work gives me some 'free time' to cruise the UI/macro forum. 2) software limited -While very powerful, there is potential to abuse macros so that, for example, you could hit one button and your character would kill every mob in range (eventually). This potential for abuse has cause blizzard to put some powerful limitations on macros. More about this later. 3) the One Button rule -each macro button can use only one ability each time you press the button. You can code this so that it will use a different ability each and every time you press it (and on a different target!), but you can't press the button once and, for example, have it cast all 5 self buffs on you. I don't even know where to start?! To get started with macros, it's very simple. Just log on WoW and type /m. This brings up your macro box, where you just have to hit 'new' and the game will prompt for a name and an icon. I recommend that you leave the icon as a question mark. (?) The question mark means the game will automatically pick up the picture of the ability that the macro will use. My First Macro For your first macro lets just replace a normal ability you use on your bar in combat. I'm going to use paladin abilities here, but you can replace them with whatever ability you like. So to make my first macro, I went to the /m menu in game, picked a new macro, and gave it the question mark icon. Then I click on the icon, click on the empty box, and type: /cast This is the basic core of every macro. It's basically like the verb in a sentence. You can use different 'verbs' (called slash commands) but this is probably the most popular. Since I want this macro to cast Hammer of the Righteous, I simple type that in after the /cast. /cast Hammer of the Righteous And pow! I'm done! If you drag this onto your bar and hit it a million times, you basically have the paladin protection spec in a nutshell (lol). However this doesn't really give you any extra functionality over a normal keybind. The next thing I'm going to do is make the macro heal a friendly if I have a friendly targeted, or if it's an enemy it will use SotR (shield of the righteous). To do this you add a conditional. This says 'only cast this spell if 'X' is true.' It looks like this (with a breakdown of the macro underneath): /cast [help] Word of Glory; [harm] Shield of the Righteous \__/ \____/\__________/\/ \____/\__________________/ verb-conditional---|---separator|----------------| -------------------ability---------conditional----Ability What this macro will do is check the status of your current target. A 'friendly'(help) value will cause my paladin to heal the target. An 'enemy'(harm) value will trigger the attack ability. If you can grasp macros thus far, you've already learned enough to make macros useful for you. Putting this on your bar will basically cut the number of keybinds you need by 1. Modifier macro commands Another handy feature you can use with macros is called a Modifier. This may sound familiar but it's possible to set a macro so that it will use a different ability or spell if you hold down control, alt, or shift. Here's a basic example: /cast [mod:alt] Seal of Truth;[mod:ctrl] Blessing of Kings;[mod:shift] Righteous Fury; Seal of Insight If you had this macro bound to 1, and you press 1, it would cast Seal of truth (and the seal picture would be on the keybind). Pressin ctrl would change the icon to blessing of kings and would cast blessing of kings if you pressed ctrl-1, etc....Raygecow149 Dec 28, 2016
Well, I think, a “wall of of text” is not defined by the amount of characters. To create a wall of text you need two things: lots of characters, and lots of missing line breaks / paragraphs. I’m completely aware of that, and I’m always trying to section and format my texts in a manner that makes it usable for readers ;) I think the limit of 990 chars is not contributing to avoid walls of text. (It’s easy to build a a wall of text with only 500 chars, but I think you got what I mean…) 

I made some route changes to the Horde levels 43-44 sections.  I have swapped 44 Dustwallow Marsh with 44 Desolace (the entire sections). This allowed me to do Deadmire (at lvl 43 instead of 38) and then go stop at TB to turn in Deadmire + The Black Shield at the same time, then fly quickly to do the Desolace stuff.  Doing 44 Desolace is now mandatory because I think its faster with the new routes. This will also make the level 53 grind much shorter.  I think these were great changes.

Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1


If your pet's health gets too low or its attacks aren't very effective against a certain combatant, you can always switch out your current pet with another companion on your team. Only pets that are considered active (i.e., those in your three Battle Pet Slots), may be switched in and out during the battle. Once the match is over, you can always change up your active pet team, which is useful if one of your pets is low on health or dead.
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